Cultural Enrichment Week

The College kicked off Cultural Enrichment Week Monday evening, October 7, 2019. The Student Government Association hosted a potluck dinner. Attendees enjoyed everything from sopapillas to rumbledethumps. The fall speaker series followed with Micah Flint, MPA, RN, from the Institute for International Medicine (INMED).

 

Flint presented on the many components that affect culture. He said culture was much more than one’s race but involved a variety of components such as language, rituals, customs, beliefs, and more.

 

When providing health care, Flint recommended always having an understanding of different cultures. He shared his story of being a nurse volunteer in Africa. While in Africa, he worked in an area that had a strict caste system. In this system, the nomadic tribe was always served, treated, or waited on last. The volunteers were warned treating tribe members before other patients would result in devastating the reputation of the clinic. 

 

Flint said that in the States, there is a move to patient-centered, culturally sensitive health care. The primary goal is to provide individualized care and restore the emphasis on personal relationships through the application of culturally sensitive skills.

 

Flint introduced Kleinmans’s eight questions to help health care providers treat patients with cultural sensitivity. These questions go beyond asking “Where does it hurt?” to better understanding the patients’ fears, beliefs, and understanding of their illness. 

 

On Tuesday, the Student Government Association invited students to dress up in attire to reflect one’s culture and background. The College also provided a free lunch with Greek food for all.

 

The week wrapped up with a large-scale display titled “Facing Prejudice.” The exhibition is a journey of questions, personal insights, and factual statements, designed to challenge viewers and empower them to fight for understanding and tolerance in their everyday lives. 

 

It’s been a terrific week as the College celebrated the varied backgrounds that make our community so richly diverse.